Catterline Harbour

Catterline harbour and pier

Safe haven on a rocky coast

I have to admit to a special fondness for Catterline Harbour, as this is where Montrose Sub Aqua Club have their boathouse and bothy.  I’ve been a member of the club for several years and have dived in the harbour, and around the island further out in the bay, on many occasions.

Seals breed (and sing) on the island and occasionally you’ll meet some of the bolder ones, very briefly, under water.  Mostly they’re too shy because for years they’ve been killed to protect the wild salmon fishing industry up and down this coast.  There’s a lot of kelp and other seaweed growing in the bay, so they have plenty of places to hide from clumsy divers.  They may look ungainly and sometimes very uncomfortable on land but underwater they’re sleek and surprisingly fast movers.  Their song is a weird keening, other-worldly and infinitely sad.  You can see how legends like those of the silkies and mermaids grew up around them.

The pier and harbour

Catterline Harbour got its first pier in 1730, according to a notice on the pier wall. However, according to the Undiscovered Scotland site, the pier wasn’t built until 1810; maybe that was a replacement.  Catterline Harbour Trust keeps it in working order, and there’s an honesty box for donations from anyone who’s enjoyed their visit.Notice on Catterline Pier

The surface is uneven, made up of whatever rock came to hand, regularly patched and infilled to repair weather damage – but a walk to the end is the precursor to any dive trip.  How far down can you see?  Is it worth going in?

The pier would have been a welcome structure, whenever it was built, as the rocks in the bay form reefs that can do serious damage to a boat – one of them rises up right in the middle of the harbour.  Boats are launched and retrieved between the natural and man-made walls: dinghies, canoes, the dive club’s inflatables, Catterline Coastal Rowing Club’s wooden boat.  There are also a couple of permanently-afloat boats belonging to local crab and lobster fishermen.  It’s quite a bustling scene on a sunny Sunday!

The harbour has been used by fishing boats for over a thousand years, apparently, mostly on legitimate business.  But smuggling often helped to boost the fishermen’s meagre income, and one of the houses on the cliff overlooking the harbour was built for Customs and Excise men to watch for illicit landings.

Catterline’s claims to fame

Catterline has two main claims to fame.  The first is that it’s where St Ninian landed when he began the long and troublesome task of converting the Picts to Christianity.  The local church isn’t named after him, however: it’s called St Philip’s, though its site may have been holy right back to Ninian’s day.

The village’s other claim to celebrity is the group of artists who came to Catterline for its wonderful views and quality of light.  They included Joan Eardley, Annette Soper, Angus Neil and Lil Neilson.  It’s a great place for photography, too, especially when the waves are crashing over the rocks.

Rocks and boulders

On a small promontory stands Catterline’s most unusual feature, a vertical mudstone-and-boulder stack about 40’ high.  You can climb to the top if you’re brave – and come back down if you’re even braver.  I’m not!

The foreshore is a great place for rock-pooling.  Some of the pools are big enough for really quite big critters to survive in ‘til the tide returns.  It’s always worth a poke around and there’s usually a family group or two doing just that.  At low spring tides the harbour can look as though someone’s pulled the plug out.  The water recedes half-way across the rocky bay, which makes retrieving boats very hard work.

Without its pier Catterline might well have gone the same way as its neighbour, Crawton, abandoned by 1910 as the boats moved to the safe harbour of Stonehaven, a few miles to the north.  Instead Catterline survived and thrives.  It’s worth a visit – just avoid sunny Sundays!

Find out more

Catterline is on the coast between Inverbervie and Stonehaven; the OS coordinates are 56.895271, -2.214943.

Montrose Sub Aqua Club (BSAC500) is on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MontroseSAC

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5 Best-Kept Secrets of Angus

Glen Clova in Angus
Glen Clova in Angus

Angus: what most visitors miss

The county of Angus lies on Scotland’s east coast between Dundee and Aberdeen.  If people have heard of it, it’s usually because major golf tournaments are contested at Carnoustie, a links course of fearsome reputation.

But there’s so much more to Angus than golf.  It’s home to at least five “best-kept secrets”.

Lunan Bay

One of my favourite walking spots is Lunan Bay, two miles of sandy beach on a gentle curve backed by dunes.  The river Lunan runs into it near the southern end, its rushes hiding swan’s nests.  On the bank above sit the sandstone ruins of Red Castle, weathered over the centuries into fantastical shapes.

In a corner of the bay, the old fishing village of Eassie hugs the ledge of the cliff.  It’s now a gated community, a single-track road its only connection to the outside world.

The bay is one of the best places on the east coast of Scotland for surf and the sky is often colourful with the sails of kite-surfers.  Hundreds of gulls and shags nest on the cliffs, and the rocks are a larder of shellfish waiting to be harvested.

Best of all, even on a sunny weekend when the car park is full it’s big enough to feel as though you have the place to yourself.

Glamis Castle

Hidden away in woodland near Forfar lies Glamis.  The childhood home of the Queen Mum, it is apparently one of the most haunted castles in Scotland.  A confection of pink sandstone and turrets, it nestles low against a dramatic backdrop of high hills.

Now open to the public, Glamis is a magical place, full of history, atmosphere and quirky charm.  I’ve written a longer post on it.

The Angus Glens

… are five valleys running deep into the foothills of the Cairngorms.  According to local legend, the Glens are the imprint of God’s fingers when he finished creating the world.

They vary from gentle, river-created valleys like Glen Esk to the drama of Glen Clova, gouged from the hills by ice-age glaciers. Although popular with walkers, the glens are still quite empty of people, offering great opportunities for wildlife-spotting if you’re quiet enough.

Montrose Airfield

Montrose was the first full-time military airfield in Scotland, way back in 1913. Two hangars from that period are still in use, though not for their original purpose.

Although no planes fly from Montrose now you can still see the runways.  You can still use them too, as many cyclists, walkers and runners prove.  The old Station HQ is now a museum crammed with information, models – and ghosts.  During both World Wars the airfield was a training camp for pilots, many of whom are still “there”: both staff and visitors see and hear them .

You can read more about the airfield here.

Arbroath Abbey

The Abbey of Arbroath has a good claim to be the home of Scottish nationalism, because it was here, in 1320, that the Declaration of Arbroath was signed.

Officially this was a letter to the Pope claiming the right of Scotland as an independent country to take up arms in its own defence.  In fact it was aimed at the English King who wanted to annex Scotland, to warn him “hands off!”.  The Abbey is now a ruin, but the Declaration still has life in Scots’ hearts.

And there’s more…

Angus has plenty more to offer than these five best-kept secrets.  It often feels like the part of Scotland no-one visits.  People rush up the main road between Perth and Aberdeen, missing the real treat in the middle.

There’s farmland, forestry, mountain, ocean; breath-taking views, fine architecture, music, art; Arbroath smokies to eat and locally-produced beer, gin and vodka to drink.  The air is clean; it’s a peaceful county.

If you want something more energetic, Angus offers excellent horse- and mountain bike-riding, scuba diving, hill-walking, canoeing, and (of course) golf.

So next time you’re heading from Perth to Aberdeen, take some time out to explore Angus, Scotland’s hidden-in-plain-sight gem, and discover its secrets for yourself.

Find out more

https://www.visitangus.com/ has listings for things to do , places to go, accommodation and everything else you need for a first visit to the county.

For a list of recommended accommodation providers, see the DAVAA website.

 

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